Melissa Caddick’s financial magazine cover shows how she swindled victims with $ 20 million


It’s the cover of the magazine that shows how Sydney’s most notorious con artist, Melissa Caddick, fooled everyone: her family, friends and industry.

Daily Mail Australia can exclusively reveal how Caddick made the cover of a major financial planning magazine nearly two decades before scandalizing its industry.

“A wise choice,” read the October 2003 cover of Independent Financial Adviser magazine. “Australia’s Best Planning Practice”.

It was a public relations whirlwind for Wise Financial Services, the legitimate and successful planning firm of which Caddick was chief executive.

But in hindsight, it illustrates how Caddick built a reputation for professional success – which she then used to cheat on friends, family and acquaintances.

“We trusted her because she was Melissa,” said a victim of Caddick’s later alleged fraud operation Maliver Pty Ltd.

Melissa Caddick appeared on the cover of a trade magazine in October 2003 under a former publisher. At the time, she was working with a legitimate financial planning company

Caddick at work with staff at Wise Financial Services, in which she had a minority stake, in the early 2000s

Caddick at work with staff at Wise Financial Services, in which she had a minority stake, in the early 2000s

Caddick was already a successful image in the early 2000s. Then, she became a minority shareholder of Wise Financial, a stake she held for three years.

She featured in the header of the company’s website, dressed in a powder blue suit, and distributed Beads of High Finance Wisdom in the Australian newspaper.

His advice was: “I would never leave 100% of my assets in one asset class, like property or stocks, and I would never leave money under the bed.”

Wise’s standards were strict, and public records show she held a legitimate Australian financial services license until 2004. (She would later be accused of using someone else’s license for several years).

“You couldn’t scratch your nose without Compliance being all over the place,” said a former colleague at Wise. And Caddick was an expert on the subject. “She knows what to do and what not to do.”

The former colleague said Caddick would later have known she was breaking the “cardinal sins” of financial planning.

After Wise, Caddick worked for a separate financial planning entity in Sydney. She had a baby boy around that time with her ex-husband now.

Caddick (pictured drinking champagne on the roof of a Sydney school with her husband, Anthony Koletti) was believed by family and friends

Caddick (pictured drinking champagne on the roof of a Sydney school with her husband, Anthony Koletti) was believed by family and friends

The watchdog for the company ASIC has alleged in court documents that Caddick’s financial embezzlement may have started as early as May 2009.

But its main frauds in Maliver – which often involved false CommSec documents regularly sent to customers – would have really started in 2013.

Authorities say Caddick used her business to make more than $ 20 million, which she then splurged on designer clothes, expensive jewelry and flash cars.

Provisional liquidators said this week that Caddick had been “meticulous” in her work, making fun of false financial reports by her clients using Microsoft Excel.

She deliberately resisted suggestions that she would use specific accounting software so that she could deceive auditors, accountants and other advisers.

The mystery of Caddick’s disappearance may be coming to an end.

His decaying foot was found by campers on Sunday. It was inside an Asics Gel Nimbus 22 sneaker when it ran aground at Bournda Beach, southeast of Bega on the south coast of New South Wales.

“(The foot) had been in the water for quite some time,” Deputy Commissioner Mick Willing said on Friday.

“Scientists were able to extract DNA from the foot and match it to a DNA sample that we had already obtained from a toothbrush belonging to Melissa from her relatives,”

Assistant Commissioner Mick Willing and Detective Inspector Gretchen Atkins announced Friday the discovery of a foot believed to belong to Melissa Caddick.  Before the disturbing discovery, Caddick was widely believed to be alive

Assistant Commissioner Mick Willing and Detective Inspector Gretchen Atkins announced Friday the discovery of a foot believed to belong to Melissa Caddick. Before the disturbing discovery, Caddick was widely believed to be alive

Caddick went missing from the family home in Dover Heights on November 11.  His foot was found last Sunday in an Asics sneaker on Bournda beach, south-east of Bega.

Caddick went missing from the family home in Dover Heights on November 11. His foot was found last Sunday in an Asics sneaker on Bournda beach, south-east of Bega.

A bouquet of pink roses was left outside the front door of the Caddick family home in Dover Heights on Friday.

A bouquet of pink roses was left outside the front door of the Caddick family home in Dover Heights on Friday.

Detectives suspect Caddick committed suicide shortly after Asic and federal police raided his home on November 11 – although they do not rule out foul play.

Her family is devastated and floral tributes were mounted outside her cliffside home on Friday.

ASIC’s investigation into his alleged fraud continues.

Few of those who knew Caddick and trusted her with their savings believed she was capable of the deception she allegedly carried out.

But why wouldn’t they trust her, as she was draped in designer jewelry, hosted dinner parties at her $ 6.1 million Dover Heights home, talked about her specialist expertise, and was a covergirl of the financial industry?


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