Magazine article – Continental Mag http://continentalmag.com/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 21:47:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://continentalmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-2-120x120.png Magazine article – Continental Mag http://continentalmag.com/ 32 32 Bradenton Farmers Markets – Living Bradenton :: SRQ Magazine Article by Chloe Cuyler https://continentalmag.com/bradenton-farmers-markets-living-bradenton-srq-magazine-article-by-chloe-cuyler/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 21:12:20 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/bradenton-farmers-markets-living-bradenton-srq-magazine-article-by-chloe-cuyler/ SRQ Review | december 2021 Through Chloe cuyler In Shopping A hidden and unsung treasure of Florida’s Gulf Coast. Downtown Bradenton and the coastal areas are full of things to do and places to visit, including beaches, shops, museums and galleries. But let’s not forget the Farmers’ Markets, a gathering where community members can come […]]]>

A hidden and unsung treasure of Florida’s Gulf Coast. Downtown Bradenton and the coastal areas are full of things to do and places to visit, including beaches, shops, museums and galleries. But let’s not forget the Farmers’ Markets, a gathering where community members can come together and support local small businesses and farms while getting an assortment of organic groceries and original, handmade products. Here are the ones to stop this season.

Bradenton Town Center Public Market

Open October through May, this shopping and music event takes place on Old Main Street in downtown Bradenton every Saturday morning from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Visitors can expect an exciting environment filled with fresh produce, hot coffees, desserts, handmade chocolates, jewelry, candles, soaps and fresh cut flowers. And on nearby Fourth Avenue West, patrons can enjoy art, crafts, and live music, as Mainly Art hosts its weekly gathering of local artisans and artists exhibiting and selling their work. Parking is free and, because leashed dogs are allowed, bring your adorable furry baby and make it a Saturday morning outing for the whole family.

101 Old Main St., Bradenton, 941-932-9439, bradentonpublicmarket.com, @bradentonpublicmarket.

Gamble Creek Farms Farmer’s Market

Open five days a week (Wednesday to Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.), this market is a little corner of paradise for lovers of the earth. Gamble Creek Farm is all about sustainability and a clean lifestyle. For this reason, the market only offers the freshest, locally grown and 100% organic produce. Shoppers can choose from a wide range of products including baked goods, plants, and even meat and seafood. Gamble Creek Farms Farm Market, being an indoor market, also offers visitors the luxury of air conditioning. while they shop, a welcome feature to combat the inevitable Florida heat.

14950 Golf Course Rd., Parrish, 941-548-4805, gamblecreekfarms.com, @gamblecreekfarms.

Beach market at Coquina beach

If the sand between your toes and the sea breeze tickling your nose weren’t enough reason to head to the beach, this market certainly is. Coquina Beach Beach Market is a weekly outdoor market that runs from December to March on Wednesdays and Sundays, April to July on Wednesdays and Fridays and after a brief closure, reopens for its next season every Sunday November. Each market is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., regardless of the day of the week. Overlooking the beautiful island beach, this market is home to vendors selling handbags, jewelry, pottery, as well as health and beauty products. And although dogs are not allowed in the park, the market is accessible to wheelchairs and strollers.

2650 Gulf Dr., S. Bradenton Beach, 941-518-4431, @beachmarketatcoquinabeach.

Anna Maria Farmer’s Market at City Pier Park

Every Tuesday from October through May, the town of Anna Maria hosts a small farmers’ market on the waterfront City Pier Park, on the corner of Pine Avenue and South Bay Blvd. Baskets and bins of fresh Southwest Florida produce are always available, along with local baked goods, jams, honey, gourmet foods and more. The opening hours of the market are from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

103 N Bay Blvd., Anna Maria, 941-708-6130 ext 121, cityofannamaria.com.


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In a New York minute https://continentalmag.com/in-a-new-york-minute/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/in-a-new-york-minute/ Zaza is bringing back the practical lasagna pizzaz. SRQ Review | November 2021 Through Britt mattie In restaurants Powerful couple and transplanted from big cities, Franco and Mia Gatto of Zaza Italian Comfort Food, settle into family life in Sarasota with their Classica and Verde catches. Photo taken by Wyatt Kostygan. In the city of […]]]>

Zaza is bringing back the practical lasagna pizzaz.

Powerful couple and transplanted from big cities, Franco and Mia Gatto of Zaza Italian Comfort Food, settle into family life in Sarasota with their Classica and Verde catches. Photo taken by Wyatt Kostygan.

In the city of all the cities one that’s home to over 26,000 restaurants and 8.4 million people – you never take for granted falling in love with that special person or place in New York City. Ergo, college lovers Mia and Franco Gatto never took for granted the first intimate dinners together at a romantic little Upper East Side Italian trattoria called “ZaZa”. “They had burrata imported from Italy on Wednesday, it was mind blowing,” says Mia. “The restaurant has been closed for years now, but it will always have a special place in our hearts. Especially since it’s also the name of our favorite idiot SNL sketch – if you haven’t seen it, look up SNL Lasagna!

LASAGNAS ARE MADE FROM SCRATCHES WITH WHOLE ORGANIC INGREDIENTS AND HAND-ROLLED PASTA SHEETS. PHOTO COURTESY OF @GATTO_PHOTO_

With a shared love for cooking and photography, Mia and Franco both took restaurant jobs in the city to pay the bills while pursuing their passion for photography. Over the years, Franco went from cook to executive to chef at a number of leading gourmet restaurants in New York City, Honolulu, Boulder and Denver, while Mia eventually turned to digital marketing and electronic commerce. Their two career paths seemed to line up perfectly for their own joint venture, named, you guessed it, Zaza.

Photo courtesy of @gatto_photo_

PHOTO COURTESY OF @GATTO_PHOTO_

Just because they slowed their frenetic and hectic pace in Manhattan by moving to Sarasota didn’t mean life slowed down around them. “When we had our first baby in the summer of 2020, frankly, we were exhausted,” says Mia. “We needed high quality, satisfying meals that were easy to prepare, without too much work and without waste. We were overpaying for a lot of take out and delivery, but it didn’t itch that itch for something warm. Then one day Franco made some of his lasagna – a family recipe handed down. He prepared more than they needed for a sitting evening, portioned it out, and froze individual pieces to get them ready for the next few days to easily reheat meals. Benissimo. Launching their new ‘take out and bake’ lasagna delivery business in September, the Gattos are now sharing their beloved Italian recipes with other families. “We want to give families the opportunity to have fun when they’re too busy or tired to spend that time in the kitchen on their own,” she says. “Homemade lasagna makes everyday life a special occasion.”

Photo by Wyatt Kostygan.

PHOTO BY WYATT KOSTYGAN.

Zaza’s “Classica” lasagna recipe is an adaptation of Franco’s family, having immigrated from Genoa and Asti, IT, while the “Verde” lasagna was a creation in its own right. “Our recipes are no secret because they are so simple. Nothing is hidden here, everything is on the label, ”says Mia. “The only secret is that it takes a lot of time, patience and hard work. Most people don’t realize the difference hand-rolled pasta makes to a dish.

Get yours at eatzaza.com and @zaza_srq or at Sarasota's Meadows Farmers Market on Sundays

GET THE VTRE AT EATZAZA.COM AND @ZAZA_SRQ OR AT SARASOTA MEADOWS FARMERS MARKET ON SUNDAY

Find every container of hand-wrapped Zaza lasagna ready to put in the oven to enjoy, without the kitchen cleaning. And just when you think you’ve had your fair share of lasagna to go, the Gattos will (no pun intended) be releasing additional homemade pasta dishes like hand-pinched farfalle bow ties to order for the upcoming holiday season.


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Much Ado about Hamlet’s – SRQist :: Article from SRQ Magazine by Phil Lederer https://continentalmag.com/much-ado-about-hamlets-srqist-article-from-srq-magazine-by-phil-lederer/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/much-ado-about-hamlets-srqist-article-from-srq-magazine-by-phil-lederer/ Two kitchens, both worthy, In beautiful Sar’sota, where we set our stage, From old grudge to new mutiny, Where diners find Hamlet’s Eatery. SRQ Review | November 2021 Through Phil lederer In restaurants THE STORY When Kim Livengood founded Hamlet’s Eatery a year ago, she envisioned it not only as a haven for the ever-hungry […]]]>

Two kitchens, both worthy, In beautiful Sar’sota, where we set our stage, From old grudge to new mutiny, Where diners find Hamlet’s Eatery.

THE STORY

When Kim Livengood founded Hamlet’s Eatery a year ago, she envisioned it not only as a haven for the ever-hungry merchants and millers of the bustling Apricot & Lime Indie Market bazaar, but as an olive branch for these factions of gourmets still in rivalry. vegans and carnivores. With a menu split down the middle, Hamlet’s seeks to bring both sides to the table by offering curated dining options for anyone wondering, “Meat or Not Meat?” So for every “Hamlet’s” on the menu – beef sliders topped with crushed pecans, caramelized onions and gorgonzola cheese – diners will also find a “Beyond Shakespeare”, a vegan slider with avocado, eggplant bacon, spinach and balsamic glaze. And between vegan burritos, tofu scrambles, jack fruit tacos and black bean patties with guacamole and ancho chili barbecue sauce, Livengood imagines that Hamlet’s is as much an opportunity for non-vegans to explore new flavors as it’s a place for vegans to get their fix.

ADJUSTMENT

The courtyard of the bazaar at Apricot & Lime. Hamlet’s large blue food truck commands a length of the square, sandwiched between the bazaar proper and a large canopy for shaded outdoor seating, connected to a newly renovated indoor dining area for those craving air conditioning. An artificial grass lawn supports a handful of picnic tables and a rainbow-colored mural on the wall reminds everyone to ‘be amazing’.

THE CASTING

Kim Livengood: Founder / owner of Hamlet’s Eatery. A local PR specialist whose mother founded The Bazaar at Apricot & Lime, she wants her new “Limelight District” of Sarasota to continue to grow.

Chef Bob: Chef at Hamlet’s. Signature dish: Bob’s Famous Crab Cakes, Chesapeake style.

Michelle and Susy: Hamlet’s extra hands, helping Chef Bob, taking orders and managing the food.

LOCAL SUPPORT CHARACTERS

Lelu’s Coffee Cold Brew, Boombacha Kombucha, Southern Sweet Tea Company and Suncoast Cookies

821 Apricot Ave., Sarasota, hamletseatery.com, @hamletseatery


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Old Fashioned Slings – Forage :: SRQ Magazine Article by Britt Mattie https://continentalmag.com/old-fashioned-slings-forage-srq-magazine-article-by-britt-mattie/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 04:09:47 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/old-fashioned-slings-forage-srq-magazine-article-by-britt-mattie/ Photograph by Wes Roberts Sensitive to its namesake, the former is one of the oldest cocktails in the Cocktail Cannon. A dated and beloved infused drink – iconically built in the glass – saw a fruity version all the rage after the Prohibition Era (involving a slice of cherry and orange, with the mixture of […]]]>
Photograph by Wes Roberts

Sensitive to its namesake, the former is one of the oldest cocktails in the Cocktail Cannon. A dated and beloved infused drink – iconically built in the glass – saw a fruity version all the rage after the Prohibition Era (involving a slice of cherry and orange, with the mixture of a lump of sugar or a simple syrup added). This version remains prevalent today, but we’re in the mood to defend more basic, progressive interpretations that still allow for the avant-garde flavors of a sweet bourbon or rye burst, but also offer a little twist ( orange twist, if you will) on this classic libation.

Old-fashioned coffee: Bourbon Buffalo Trace, kahlua, shot of espresso and orange bitters, $ 12, Brine Seafood & Raw Bar, 2250 Gulf Gate Dr., Sarasota, 941-952-3039, brinesarasota.com, @brinesarasotaoysterbar

Old Fashioned Kojo: Bourbon infused with toasted brown rice, demerara syrup, lemon bitters and homemade citrus oil, $ 13, KOJO, 1289 N Palm Ave., Sarasota, 941-536-9717, eatkojo.com, @eatkojo

Old-fashioned spicy pear: Spicy St. George Pear Liqueur, Redemption Bourbon, Mashed Orange & Cherry with a Hint of Bitter, $ 14, Selva Grill, 1345 Main St., Sarasota, 941-362-4427, selvagrill.com, @selvagrill

Old-fashioned barrel: 1792 Bourbon, toasted demerara syrup, Broker’s bitters, barrel aged, $ 12, Cask & Ale, 1548 Main St., Sarasota, 941-702-8740, caskandalekitchen.com, @cask_ale_srq

Made the old-fashioned way: Bourbon Smooth Ambler Contradiction, Pistachio Cane Syrup, Barrel Spiced Bitter, Orange Zest & Seasonal Smoke Topping, $ 15, MADE, 1990 Main St # 112, Sarasota, 941-953-2900, maderestaurant.com, @made_srq

Mr. Sazerac: EBourbon infused with arl gray, absinthe mouthwash, demerara syrup, orange bitters and a maple syrup ice cube, $ 13 Pangea Alchemy Laboratory, 1564 Main Street, Sarasota, 941-870-5555, pangealounge.com

Old-fashioned circus: Bourbon Old Forester, toasted pecans, cinnamon and vanilla, bitters, $ 9, Circo SRQ, 1435 2nd St., Sarasota, 941-253-0978, circosrq.com, @circosrq

Old-fashioned blas: Bourbon Bulliet, Bitter Orange Bitter Truth, Brown Sugar Syrup, Black Cherries and Orange, $ 13, Blase Café & Martini Bar, 5263 Ocean Blvd, Sarasota, 941-349-9822, theblasecafe.com, @theblasecafesiestakey

Old Spanish: Ezra Brooks 99 Bourbon with Cinnamon Saffron Smoky Bitter, $ 14, Sage, 1216 First St., Sarasota, 941-445-5660, sagesrq.com, @sagesrq


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Cozy Staycations – Wanderlust :: Article from SRQ magazine by Olivia Liang https://continentalmag.com/cozy-staycations-wanderlust-article-from-srq-magazine-by-olivia-liang/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 04:09:40 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/cozy-staycations-wanderlust-article-from-srq-magazine-by-olivia-liang/ Three stays under the radar allow you to roam in a state of satisfaction and relaxation when you need to get away from it all SRQ Review | November 2021 Through Olivia liang Travelling Not all who wander are lost. True, but recently trying to wander has been a bit disorienting, to say the least. […]]]>

Three stays under the radar allow you to roam in a state of satisfaction and relaxation when you need to get away from it all

Not all who wander are lost. True, but recently trying to wander has been a bit disorienting, to say the least. And although we live in a prime vacation destination, another day at the crowded beach with tourists or an evening in the crowded city was not enough for a dream getaway. Instead, people have risen to the challenge and taken “stays” to a whole new level, investing in 20, 30 or 60 minute car trips to experience that missed feeling of seeing home in the rearview mirror.

The Londoner

For all Anglophiles, sipping tea as you settle into a new British drama on Netflix, historic downtown Bradenton could be the key to your heart with The Londoner Bed & Breakfast & Tearooms. Visit Bradenton like a tourist while feeling like a true Briton in this renovated historic house, built in 1906, where you can sip a cup of flowery tea while savoring every bite of a scone (served with sour cream and jam). When you sleep in the Kensington, Victoria or Westminster rooms, you’ll never know home is less than an hour’s drive away. The Londoner Bed and Breakfast, 304 15th St. W, Bradenton, 941-741-4981, thelondonerinn.com

Palmetto riverside

Forget the “air” in Airbnb and instead remember the days of historic homes with creaky floors, comfy duvets, and secluded views. At the Palmetto Riverside Bed and Breakfast, located in historic downtown Palmetto, Old Florida has never felt so good with appetizers and a river breeze, vintage furniture and an outdoor chandelier on the patio Not to mention a private limited edition champagne label, “La Diva.” You will be greeted by Wim and Mieke Lippens, your Belgian innkeepers, and will feel like you are really away from the hubbub of the house. Palmetto Riverside Bed and Breakfast, 1102 Riverside Dr., Palmetto, 941-981-5331, palmettoriverside.com/bnb

Little house nap

Have you ever seen these model homes on wheels on their way to a mysterious destination? It’s not like that. Tiny House Siesta offers rentals for locals and tourists alike who want something a little different. Lined up in a colorful row on Avenue A, Tiny House Siesta rentals are the perfect place to stay for anyone you want to get away from or get away from. The bright blue Aqua Oasis home sleeps up to six and has stairs that double as cupboards and a barn door leading to the rain shower. Or try the neon yellow Margarita, complete with an outdoor patio, Welcome to Paradise pillows, parrot murals and tropical themed linens. Located just across the South Bridge – just steps from Siesta Key Beach – your Tiny House Siesta rental will offer sun and surf in a whole new light, reminding you why Sarasota truly is such a premier vacation destination. Tiny House Siesta, 6600 Ave. A, Sarasota, 941-474-3782, tinyhousesiesta.com, @tinyhousesiesta

IMAGES WITH THE PROPERTY AUTHORIZATION.


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Coastal Blues – Nest :: SRQ Magazine Article by Britt Mattie https://continentalmag.com/coastal-blues-nest-srq-magazine-article-by-britt-mattie/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 21:26:31 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/coastal-blues-nest-srq-magazine-article-by-britt-mattie/ Orange Moon Interiors brings a touch of renovated rowboat home a palette of blues to their seascape sanctuary. SRQ Review | November 2021 Through Britt mattie In Architecture Coastal elegance shines through this oceanfront Longboat Key condo with custom pieces like warm walnut counters, white mirrored and paneled walls, built-in glass shelves, ombre-colored fan tiling […]]]>

Orange Moon Interiors brings a touch of renovated rowboat home a palette of blues to their seascape sanctuary.

Coastal elegance shines through this oceanfront Longboat Key condo with custom pieces like warm walnut counters, white mirrored and paneled walls, built-in glass shelves, ombre-colored fan tiling and light fixture coral inspired pendant. “A lot of times people tear off old and dated items during a renovation, but I’m really happy that we’ve given new life to things like the mirrored wall as it reflects the water and light that comes from it beautifully. from the beach, ”says Kelly Kaiser. , the owner and lead designer of Orange Moon Interiors.

HOME VIGNETTE BY DESIGN & MARKETING STUDIO

The owner, for this complete interior renovation project, called on Kaiser to bring to life a very specific, “creative and fun” vision. And in a world full of minimalist, neutral design spaces that are trendy today, this client wanted color. “She didn’t let trends define the look of her home, instead she let her own happiness guide her design decisions,” says Kaiser. “She feels happy inside the color and she wanted this space to be her happy place.” A seascape color palette really brings it home for this Gulfside dwelling while the accessories say “you’re at the beach,” but “with texture, instead of kitsch,” notes Kaiser. As a color expert in her field, it is essential to choose that absolutely perfect shade for a color-loving client, and even more so to find the right shade of blue for those who live by the ocean.

Photo by Jimmy White

PHOTO BY JIMMY WHITE

Landing in shades of blue unique for this particular client, a deep slate grass canvas wallpaper envelops the master suite bedroom with a texture that mimics waves while the aqua-azure and turquoise mosaic tiling of the bathroom suggests fish or mermaid scales. “Ironically, early in the design process, the client really wanted to avoid aqua,” Kaiser shares, “but as the design evolved, we both discovered that when aqua was mixed with it. space, she really loved it. This blend of blues brings a richness that makes this house so comfortable it wraps you like a warm beach towel.

Photo by Jimmy White

PHOTO BY JIMMY WHITE

Source: Orange Moon Interiors, PO Box 14029, Bradenton, orangemooninteriors.com


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Documentary “Treasure Hunters”, based on a New York Magazine article, in the works of Netflix and director Theo Love (EXCLUSIVE) https://continentalmag.com/documentary-treasure-hunters-based-on-a-new-york-magazine-article-in-the-works-of-netflix-and-director-theo-love-exclusive/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 14:00:30 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/documentary-treasure-hunters-based-on-a-new-york-magazine-article-in-the-works-of-netflix-and-director-theo-love-exclusive/ Filmmaker Theo Love is directing “Treasure Hunters”, a feature-length documentary based on the New York Magazine article “The Great 21st-Century Treasure Hunt”. Netflix will distribute the documentary, with Vox Media Studios and Nomadica Films set to produce. More Variety Benjamin Wallace wrote the article that inspired the non-fiction film, which was released in November 2020. […]]]>

Filmmaker Theo Love is directing “Treasure Hunters”, a feature-length documentary based on the New York Magazine article “The Great 21st-Century Treasure Hunt”.

Netflix will distribute the documentary, with Vox Media Studios and Nomadica Films set to produce.

More Variety

Benjamin Wallace wrote the article that inspired the non-fiction film, which was released in November 2020. The Long Read captures an epic 10-year search “sometimes maddening, sometimes deadly, confusing” to find gold in the Rockies.

The documentary’s official login line reads: “‘Treasure Hunters’ follows the true story of Forrest Fenn, an art collector, who buried a 2010 $ 2 million treasure trove filled with gold coins rare in an unknown location with 24 cryptic worms offering the only clue to its where. More than 400,000 people have searched for it, including five deceased. Finally, last June, a former journalist by the name of Jack Stuef came forward pretending to have found it. So why doesn’t anyone believe it? Is the treasure still there somewhere?

Love, whose credits include “The Legend of Cocaine Island” and “Alabama Snake”, will be executive producer, along with Bryan Storkel. The producer has previously collaborated with Love on Netflix’s “The Legend of Cocaine Island” and HBO’s “Alabama Snake”. Storkel also directed and produced ESPN Episode 30 for 30 “The Bad Boy of Bowling” and an episode of HBO’s “State of Play”.

Additional executive producers are Vox Media Studios executives Chad Mumm, Mark W. Olsen, and Max Heckman; Nomadica Films executives Jared McGilliard and John Collin Jr.; and the executives of Gum Street Productions James Campbell and Dean King. Co-executive producers include Kurt Tondorf and David Clawson for Nomadica Films.

(Photo above: director Theo Love)

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The spirit of Miss Susie https://continentalmag.com/the-spirit-of-miss-susie/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 04:10:18 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/the-spirit-of-miss-susie/ With an increased sense of empowerment within historically black communities themselves, Newtown’s food scene comes to life. As a child, you could hardly pass the steps of Miss Susie’s social club on Martin Luther King Jr. Way without incurring her wrath. Fredd Atkins, 18-year-old former Sarasota mayor and city commissioner, remembers the atmosphere of intrigue […]]]>

With an increased sense of empowerment within historically black communities themselves, Newtown’s food scene comes to life.

As a child, you could hardly pass the steps of Miss Susie’s social club on Martin Luther King Jr. Way without incurring her wrath. Fredd Atkins, 18-year-old former Sarasota mayor and city commissioner, remembers the atmosphere of intrigue that surrounded the place. “She entertained the most sophisticated members of the community and didn’t want you to see who was in there,” Atkins says, “and even if you walked too slowly she would come out and push you.”

Miss Susie operated in a thriving Newtown community and was rumored to even have a similar facility in Polk County. This enterprising woman, devout member and patron of the New Bethel Baptist Church, represented the spirit of effort that characterized Sarasota’s black community and helped its residents find prosperity in a small seaside slice of the segregated South. Atkins remembers a handful of other food establishments run by duds. “Miss Winnie was selling hot dogs for 10 and 15 cents, depending on the size, and burgers for 25 cents,” Atkins explains, “then you had Miss Solomon’s and Miss Saver’s where you could get something to eat. Of course, part of the success of these establishments was a market hemmed in by Jim Crow-era laws that prohibited black residents of Sarasota from frequenting businesses outside of Newtown. According to Atkins, even in the 1980s, years after Sarasota was no longer separated by legislative decree, it ranked 13th in the country for strict demarcation of its residents by race. “To this day, railways still seem like a border to me,” says Atkins.

The moral and ethical imperative of desegregation is indisputable, but it was not without its unintended consequences. Once the people of Newtown were allowed to spend their money outside the community, many local businesses failed. “One of my biggest challenges is trying to explain to people that desegregation was hardly a guarantee that black people were getting better,” Atkins explains. And, along with the hard-earned money of Newtown residents going elsewhere, the Sarasotans’ refusal to do business in Newtown was adding to the economic pressure. All of this signaled the slow decline of black-owned restaurants in the Newtown community. Some have hung on, like the Town Hall Restaurant and Lounge, while others have found new incarnations, like Jamaican American Soul Food on 301 and MLK Way, which once hosted black blues bands as part of the Chitlin ‘Circuit. when the establishment was a nightclub called The Manhattan and owned by Newtown resident Johnny Simpson.

Today, spurred in part by growing movements to support more black-owned businesses, greater investments by local and national governments in historically black communities, and an increased sense of empowerment within these communities. communities themselves, Newtown’s food scene comes to life. “He definitely has the feeling of a rebirth,” Atkins says. This revival resembles the Sarasota Newtown Farmers Market, which brings fresh produce to the Newtown community on Fridays and Saturdays and allows small businesses to showcase their produce. This revival is like Stroke’s Seafood at 2745 Osprey Avenue, which offers seafood and comfort food seven days a week, with shrimp and oatmeal for breakfast, burgers and fried fish sandwiches for lunch, and all kinds of combinations of lobster, snow crab and shrimp in the evening.

This renaissance is also embodied by Samantha Koch, who opened her food truck, C & D’s Sandwich Shop, as a leap of faith. She had a career in the healthcare industry for 14 years before falling in love with her job. Born and raised in Pennsauken, New Jersey, she grew up eating cheesesteaks and pizza of a variety she couldn’t find in Sarasota. With a passion for cooking and a dream to pursue, she decided to gift the city with her hometown favorites. “I really missed that food,” Koch says, “and it’s such a joy to share it with the people here and see them light up.” And the early success of his sandwich operation came despite the pandemic. “I was building the truck for a year and a half,” Koch says, “and there you go, I finish and I open and it’s ‘hello, COVID’. But, bolstered by the constant foot and car traffic on MLK Way, where she operates her sandwich shop, she quickly found an audience for her mouth-watering assortment of hoagies, from jerk chicken cheese steaks to sausages and peppers.

“There wasn’t much on MLK in terms of food when I moved here almost 20 years ago,” she says, “and I hope more people in the neighborhood try to open their own places so that we have more variety without having to go elsewhere in town. To that end, the story goes back to Miss Susie – not the resurrected ghost of the fearless business owner of Atkins’ day, but a new incarnation with a similar spirit. Miss Susie’s Newtown kitchen was opened with great fanfare several years ago. Named in honor of the original matriarch, the restaurant project centered around soul food with a community twist. Born out of the imagination and passionate project of the late Steve Seidensticker, founder of the Tableseide Restaurant Group and its philanthropic organization Tableseide Cares, the restaurant was supposed to contribute to an economic revitalization of Newtown. Promising to hire from within the community while providing job training to local youth, the project stalled due to financial problems in the sad and untimely wake of Seidensticker’s death. But the project is back on track, led by the Seidensticker family and with renewed support from philanthropic entities and the City of Sarasota.

“Lisa and Andrew Seidensticker have been asking me for some time if I would be interested in creating the menu for Miss Susie’s Newtown Kitchen,” says executive chef Golden Monix. “Once they started talking about how they wanted to help the community and give back to the business district, I was into it. ” Although considerably younger than Atkins, Monix also remembers the original Miss Susie, how he and his friends all wondered what was going on inside. A football scholarship sent him to Arkansas Tech after graduating from Riverview High School. He worked in track and field after college, rising through the ranks to the position of unit director for the Sarasota County Boys and Girls Club. “But I’ve always had a passion for cooking, so I went back to Johnson and Wales in Charlotte, NC and worked my way up through the restaurant and restaurant business,” says Monix.

While Monix and the Seidenstickers await completion of the brick and mortar restaurant on the site of Miss Susie’s former social club, they’ve built a food truck that they can use as a lab to try out potential menu items. . They hope to feed and revitalize the community with black-eyed peas along with smoked turkey, pork chop sandwiches, baked beans, cornbread and other soul food dishes. A 16-week professional training program created in conjunction with Suncoast Technical College will seek to train and place its students in hospitality jobs in Sarasota and beyond. “In the short term, I would like Miss Susie’s to be a hub or an anchor for the community,” says Monix, “but in the long term, I hope this will help grow the community. In the meantime, the community is already doing a great job of evoking the spirit of Miss Susie, laying the groundwork for increased growth and activation in a neighborhood with a long history of perseverance and prosperity.


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Community art – City of culture :: Article from SRQ magazine by Phil Lederer https://continentalmag.com/community-art-city-of-culture-article-from-srq-magazine-by-phil-lederer/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 04:04:21 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/community-art-city-of-culture-article-from-srq-magazine-by-phil-lederer/ New Executive Director of Art Center Sarasota emphasizes collaboration and community impact as a way forward. SRQ Review | November 2021 Through Phil lederer In Visual Arts Meet the new Executive Director of Art Center Sarasota, Kinsey Robb. Photo by Wyatt Kostygan Fresh out of New York’s “mega-galleries”, Kinsey Robb left the Big Apple with […]]]>

New Executive Director of Art Center Sarasota emphasizes collaboration and community impact as a way forward.

Meet the new Executive Director of Art Center Sarasota, Kinsey Robb. Photo by Wyatt Kostygan

Fresh out of New York’s “mega-galleries”, Kinsey Robb left the Big Apple with the pandemic in full swing, in search of sandy beaches and the relative sanity that a change of scenery could offer. A few months later, remote working gave way to a complete offshoring and now Robb finds herself the last executive director of one of Sarasota’s oldest creative nonprofits, Sarasota Art Center. SRQ took a moment to talk about the importance of community, the Sarasota special draw, and the power of the jury show.

SRQ: How does it feel to be back in a gallery space?

Kinsey Robb: Appreciation of art is something I really didn’t realize I took for granted until the pandemic. The physicality of being able to sit in front of a work of art has been removed. Closed museums. The galleries have closed. I am so grateful that we now have the opportunity to sit in front of a work of art instead of seeing it on a computer screen, to be able to get up close and to have a real interaction with a work that could provoke a feeling of a kind of exchange between you and this work of art, the artist. Art is a wonderful gift, and we have been deprived of it for too long.

SRQ: Why is it an exciting time to join Art Center Sarasota?

Robb outside the Art Center Sarasota with a structure designed by Carl Abbott. Photo by Wyatt Kostygan

Robb: Project Bay is happening right now, and we are sitting on the 53 acres of what is going to be an incredible waterfront park for the sake of the people of Sarasota. There is a huge opportunity. We are an artistic organization that will now be surrounded by this beautiful environment. It’s very inspiring for us and it’s even more inspiring for the teachers who come here to give these art classes. We can now have visual examples in our backyard. Instead of a parking lot, people can look at a mangrove trail and a kayak launch pad and all that wonderful stuff.

SRQ: How do you talk about the differences between an art center and a commercial gallery space? ‘

Robb: I’ve worked in very large commercial galleries — they call them mega-galleries. It’s almost like when banks are too big to fail. It’s the equivalent of that but in the art world. You have this opportunity to learn a lot about how to work with established artists, how to work with museums, how to work with curators, with collectors. There is an impact there, but there is something completely different about the impact you can have in a community.

SRQ: Different how?

Robb: Sarasota is a city, but remains a fairly small network where everyone is very up to date with what’s going on in the city. In New York, we sometimes lose that because it’s so big. Art Center Sarasota has this ability to create a meaningful impact within the community that is recognized by the community as a whole. Being able to forge partnerships with organizations here, with companies here, with artists here? It creates a real sense of community. I sometimes think this is Sarasota’s hidden gem.

SRQ: How do you reconcile financial concerns with the creative mission of the Center?

Robb: You have your mission and you still want to uphold the value and integrity of an organization’s mission. Then you have the other side of that, which is creating a support system so that this mission can be sustainable over time. For Art Center Sarasota, the areas that need more development are fundraising capabilities and visibility. Many people do not know the Art Center, even though we have been around for almost 100 years.

SRQ: Talk about hidden gems. . .

707 N Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, 941-365-2032, artsarasota.org

Robb: A lot of people don’t even realize that you can buy some artwork at the Art Center as well. And that’s something that puts us in a different position than a museum, where the work is not for sale, or a gallery, where the work may be for sale but you don’t. maybe not the budget for it. We have works that cost a few hundred dollars, and we have a few that cost a few thousand dollars. That makes it exciting, and it really offers something for everyone.

SRQ: Is it the role of the community art center, to have something for everyone?

Robb: It is part of our mission as a community space. Sometimes art can stand in this kind of pretentious bubble. It can be very intimidating. But we are an organization that is not intimidating. We love to play with everyone. We love to have fun here. We love to encourage artists at all levels. If you would like to register for one of the courses, register for a course. If you want to submit your work for a jury exhibition, great. This is something very important about the Art Center, and something that I would never want to change, because it really serves the people here.

SRQ: What partnerships are you excited about this year?

Robb: Andy Sandberg from The Hermitage Artist Retreat and I worked on developing a series. We’re creating a sort of back-and-forth program where Art Center Sarasota will host artist talks and dialogue with the residents of the Hermitage, and then, on the other hand, we’ll bring some of our artists to the Hermitage. for interviews. I am also looking forward to an upcoming jury exhibition which will run from late January to early March, in collaboration with Suncoast Black Arts Collaborative. They don’t have the exhibition space, but we do. There is strength in unity when organizations unite.


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Sweet nostalgia – SRQist :: Article from SRQ magazine by Chloe Cuyler https://continentalmag.com/sweet-nostalgia-srqist-article-from-srq-magazine-by-chloe-cuyler/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 04:02:36 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/sweet-nostalgia-srqist-article-from-srq-magazine-by-chloe-cuyler/ At Kookies & Kream Sarasota, every day is a throwback to the 90s. SRQ Review | November 2021 Through Chloe cuyler In restaurants Eric Koenreich in his new retro candy shop Kookies & Kream, photographed by Wyatt Kostygan The 90’s. Time for MTV music video marathons, arcades and Saturday morning cartoons. A time remembered, when […]]]>

At Kookies & Kream Sarasota, every day is a throwback to the 90s.

Eric Koenreich in his new retro candy shop Kookies & Kream, photographed by Wyatt Kostygan

The 90’s. Time for MTV music video marathons, arcades and Saturday morning cartoons. A time remembered, when you stuffed your face with greasy pizza, candy and other junk food with reckless abandon. Kookies & Kream Sarasota, owned and operated by Sarasota native Eric Koenreich, is helping bring back that ’90s nostalgia one giant cookie at a time. What started out with the intention of becoming an ice cream shop, much like an average turtle coming in contact with some alien goo, has turned into something much more exciting. Namely, a cute sweet dessert shop – paying homage to the snacks of our youth and guaranteed to give millennials a blast from the past – serving huge half-pound treats with flavors inspired by Cosmic Brownies, Dunkaroos, Captain Crunch and more.

The Peanut Butter Candy Bucket: Nut Butter Crust, Chocolate Cookie with Reese’s Cups, Reese’s Take 5, Reese’s Pieces, Peanut Butter and Peanut Butter Drizzle, courtesy of @kookiesandkream

And it’s not just the aromas of cereals and candy bars that will bring you back. With decor inspired by Koenreich’s childhood haunts, stepping through the front door of Kookies & Kream can feel like you’ve been transported 20 years back to your family’s basement or into the bedroom of your childhood. Space jam posters, Spice Girls album covers, Nintendo controllers with Mario Kart games, Pokemon Barbie figurines and dolls. So if you’re in the mood for a good dose of 90’s, get yourself a Salted Caramel Twix Cookie or Reese’s Pieces FrankenCup from Kookies & Kream, pop in your favorite VHS (if that’s even possible) and indulge yourself. simpler times: late night movies and trading cards with friends, when you didn’t know anything about bills or mortgages and your biggest problem was figuring out how to invite your crush to pizza party.

Kookies & Kream, 39 S Beneva Rd., Sarasota, kookiesandkream.com


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