Magazine article – Continental Mag http://continentalmag.com/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 00:23:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://continentalmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-2-120x120.png Magazine article – Continental Mag http://continentalmag.com/ 32 32 Best of SRQ Local 2022 | Lakewood Ranch https://continentalmag.com/best-of-srq-local-2022-lakewood-ranch/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/best-of-srq-local-2022-lakewood-ranch/ Lucky pelican. Photograph by Wes Roberts. Our readers have spoken! The 2022 Best of Lakewood Ranch contest has ended and we are excited to share the winners of this year’s contest. From favorite places to dine to the best neighborhoods to live in and the best real estate agents to settle in, you’ll love and […]]]>

Lucky pelican. Photograph by Wes Roberts.

Our readers have spoken! The 2022 Best of Lakewood Ranch contest has ended and we are excited to share the winners of this year’s contest. From favorite places to dine to the best neighborhoods to live in and the best real estate agents to settle in, you’ll love and learn from the results of our annual Best of Lakewood Ranch contest.

LWR | BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT lucky pelican

The dreaded “what should we have for dinner” conversation is easily put to rest with these winners. Lakewood Ranch voters picked their Platinum award with LUCKY PELICAN as they gushed over the ATRIA CAFE Gold winner. End the evening with something sweet at the Silver sensation WICKED AWESOME ICE CREAM EMPORIUM INC or enjoy a seafood feast at the Bronze winner SPEAKS CLAM BAR – ITALIAN & SEAFOOD – LAKEWOOD RANCH. There are plenty of other places to choose from including Honorable Mentions Grove, Cassariano Italian Eatery Lakewood Ranch, Nancy’s Bar-BQ at Lorraine Corners, Libby’s, Bourbon and Bones Chophouse, and Thai Spice & Sushi.

Gabriele Harris (on Lucky Pelican): Excellent fresh food. Local. JD DeVries (on Wicked Awesome Ice Cream Emporium Inc): Delicious treats and great hospitality. Lisa Grasso (on Speaks Clam Bar – Italian & Seafood – Lakewood Ranch): Amazing food and great service every time! Platinum Winner – Lucky Pelican / Gold Winner – Atria Cafe / Silver Winner – Wicked Awesome Ice Cream Inc / Bronze Winner – Parle Clam Bar-Italian & Seafood-Lakewood Ranch.

LWR | BEST CASUAL DINING. Craft Growlers To Go and Tasting Room

Dressing up for dinner is fine and fun, but when you can’t quite commit to the glitz and glam, these cool, laid-back spots are perfect for jeans and a t-shirt type outfit. Readers loved CRAFT GROWLERS TO GO & TASTING ROOM for Platinum and just two votes behind ATRIA CAFE earned a Gold runner-up. LUCKY PELICAN made a strong impression by reappearing for LWR in silver and ED’S TAVERN fought for bronze. Don’t miss the honorable mention Bourbon and Bones Chophouse.

Courtney Barringer (on Craft Growlers To Go & Tasting Room): Great laid back local spot. Easy going and the simple but delicious menu make it a favorite spot. Aiko M (on Lucky Pelican): I find that Lucky Pelican’s seafood is fresh and their recipes are always very tasty. I think their price is good for what you get both in taste and portion size. They have a good happy hour to help with long waits. Long wait times due to crowds wanting to eat there. I always recommend Lucky Pelican as a good place for seafood. Adrian Morell (on Ed’s Tavern): Ed’s Tavern has a laid back atmosphere. The employees, customers, food and drinks are great. Platinum Winner – Craft Growlers To Go & Tasting Room / Gold Winner – Atria Cafe / Silver Winner – Lucky Pelican / Bronze Winner – Ed’s Tavern.

LWR | BEST BREAKFAST + BRUNCH Extension 400

Photo courtesy of Station 400.

Starting the day off right can be as simple as a good plate of eggs and bacon. Lakewood Ranch has plenty of places to start your joy, starting with STATION 400, Platinum-winning pancakes. A real favorite being part of several Best Of winning categories this year ATRIA CAFE wins another Gold spot and ANOTHER BROKEN EGG CAFE smashes its way to Silver. Find cookies and bacon at the bronze winner GROVE.

Courtney Barringer (on Station 400): Locally owned and operated Station 400 is always consistent with food, prices, and staff. Kathy James (on Another Broken Egg Cafe): Another Broken Egg restaurant is the “holy grail” of enjoyable dining experiences for breakfast or brunch! Not only do they have an over-the-top menu filled with an incredible variety of foods and flavors to satisfy even the pickiest of eaters, but their servers are so attentive and friendly and you get it all for a super reasonable price. What more could you want? Oh yes, and it’s in a good location too! (Try the donut cookies for a truly unique indulgence!) Platinum Winner – Station 400 / Gold Winner – Atria Cafe / Silver Winner – Another Broken Egg / Bronze Winner – Grove.

LWR | BEST MODEL HOME Mainstay – Lee Wetherington Homes

Basic model.  Photo courtesy of Lee Wetherington Homes.

Finding an oasis of your own can be tricky, but these home designs showcase the best. Platinum winner MAINSTAY – LEE WETHERINGTON HOMES takes first place this year while KORINA, JOHN CANNON HOMES are hot on their heels for a golden second place. The Silver category is completed by THE RIVIERA DEALERSHIP MODEL, KEMICK BUILDERS AND CONSULTANTS.

Gabriele Harris (on Mainstay – Lee Wethington Homes): Great floor plan, beautiful design and attention to detail. Jane Jones (on Korina, John Cannon Homes): I really loved this Korina model. The wine cellar especially; you could see all the bottle labels. If you walk into any subdivision with model homes and there is a Cannon model, their quality will be superior to all the others. The unique custom features and especially the ceiling details make this a clear winner of “Best Model Home”. Platinum Winner – Mainstay, Lee Wetherington Homes / Gold Winner – Korina, John Cannon Homes / Silver Winner – The Riviera, Kemich Builders and Consultants Concession Model.

LWR | BEST NEIGHBORHOOD Waterfront at Lakewood Ranch

Waterfront at Lakewood Ranch.

A home is where the heart is, but also where your children can make friends for life on the streets and an invitation to the barbecue is just a mailbox away. Being surrounded by a kind and inviting community is just as important to creating a home as choosing the right paint color. With new developments constantly popping up around Lakewood Ranch, these neighborhoods were remarkable. Readers voted WATERSIDE AT LAKEWOOD RANCH a Platinum Paradise while THE LAKE CLUB was a Gold Wellness. Voters sang the praises of silver selection MALLORY PARK AT LAKEWOOD RANCH BY DIVOSTA HOMES and ESPLANADE GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB AT LAKEWOOD RANCH became a top bronze winner. Check out honorable mention Bridgewater for a neighborhood delight.

Lucinda Fingado (on Waterside at Lakewood Ranch): Waterside is very close to UTC I75 and downtown Sarasota. The houses are beautiful and on large lakes. The developments are within walking distance of downtown Waterside. Downtown was well designed with restaurants located on a large lake with multiple areas for wine and exercise. Amy Gorman (on Mallory Park at Lakewood Ranch by Divosta Homes): New homes and townhouses in a carefully planned location with lots of thought and detail in the planning. Extensive recreational facilities- walking trails, pool, spa, grills and parks. Platinum Winner – Waterfront at Lakewood Ranch / Gold Winner – The Lake Club / Silver Winner – Mallory Park at Lakewood Ranch by Divosta Homes / Bronze Winner – Esplanade Golf and Country Club at Lakewood Ranch.

LWR | BEST COMMUNITY PARTNERS YMCA Lakewood Ranch Branch

Helping a community grow is key to its success and these places have shown their true colors as wonderful community partners. YMCA LAKEWOOD RANCH BRANCH is happy to win platinum while only three votes away gold goes to FAWLEY BRYANT ARCHITECTURE. This year’s silver winner was SIRIUS DAY SPA.

LWR | BEST REAL ESTATE AGENT / LAKEWOOD RANCH REALTY Rick Chang, Wagner Realty

Realtor Rick Chang of Wagner Realty.  Photo by Wyatt Kostygan.

Look no further than these housing experts for all your needs as you work through your checklist of housing must-haves. Lakewood Ranch voters know they can trust RICK CHANG, WAGNER REALTY with his expertise as a Platinum winner while others got their Gold Star tips from second place winner LISA TARJANYI . Sliding to the money is TINA CIACCHIO, LAKEWOOD RANCH REALTOR, MICHAEL SAUNDERS & COMPANY who can help you sign on the dotted line. Honorable Mentions Barbara A. Milian PA, Lakewood Ranch Realtor – Michael Saunders & Company and Kathy White Realtor: ICON Premium Realty are also ready for housing assistance.

Weyli Angus (on Rick Chang, Wagner Realty): Friendly, dedicated and a negotiator. Linda Sines (on Lisa Tarjanyi): Tarjanyi Home Sales makes you feel like family right from the start and wants the best for you. They go the extra mile to make the process really enjoyable. Angela Massaro-Fain (on Tina Ciacchio, Lakewood Ranch Realtor, Michael Saunders & Company): The ultimate professional who cares about your success and whether you’re buying or selling your home. Clever. Strategic. The hardest working real estate agent I have ever worked with. Platinum Winner – Rich Chang, Wagner Realty / Gold Winner – Lisa Tarjanyi / Silver Winner – Tina Ciacchio, Lakewood Ranch Realtor, Michael Saunders & Company.

LWR | BEST BUY The University Town Center Mall

Photo courtesy of The Mall at University Town Center.

Clicking through a computer catalog of clothing will never have the same appeal as finding the perfect dress in real life and modeling it for the dressing room mirrors. Residents of Lakewood Ranch turned to Platinum pick THE MALL AT UNIVERSITY TOWN CENTER to fill their shopping carts while others grabbed goods at gold-winning COOPER CREEK PLAZA. The silver-winning SIRIUS DAY SPA was a take-out third-place treat for a day of window shopping.

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Ushering in a special era https://continentalmag.com/ushering-in-a-special-era/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 05:54:29 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/ushering-in-a-special-era/ Croque Madame at Café L’Europe. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan.

John Horne was driving on Gulf of Mexico Drive with his wife, Amanda, contemplating a major purchase. It was a chilly (for Florida) January day, and the gregarious restaurateur realized that the major investment he was about to make – a fine-dining restaurant with a 50-year history of delighting local foodies – is exactly what some of his industry buddies were leaving behind. Ray and D’Arcy Arpke were moving away from Euphemia Haye on Longboat Key after more than 40 years. Sean Murphy sold Beach Bistro after 36 years. JP and Shay Knaggs have moved on from downtown Sarasota’s Bijou Cafe after 35 years. It was a tough time in the restaurant industry, and it wasn’t going to get any easier. And yet, here is Horne, still the artist, still the optimist, a week away from entering the gastronomic fray. What did the others know that he didn’t?

New owners John and Amanda Horne.  Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan.

NEW OWNERS JOHN AND AMANDA HORNE. PHOTOGRAPH BY WYATT KOSTYGAN.

“Have I lost my mind?” he asked Amanda. The purchase in question, of course, is the mainstay of St. Armands Cafe L’Europe. The storefront of the restaurant served as John Ringling’s sales office in the early days of Sarasota. Then, in 1973, Dutch immigrants Titus Letschert and Norbert Goldner opened a restaurant they hoped would bring fine European cuisine to locals and tourists alike. While countless restaurants have opened and closed around it, Café L’Europe has maintained its excellence. In other words, Horne wasn’t buying just any restaurant. After all, it’s where Arpke, Knaggs, Harry Christensen (of Harry’s Continental Kitchen fame) and countless successful local chefs got their start. This is Café L’Europe we are talking about. The Great Lady. Horne first viewed the property at 431 St. Armands Cir. in the early 1980s while working as a waiter at Fast Eddie’s on Anna Maria Island.

Fried chicken sandwich.  Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan.

FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH. PHOTOGRAPH BY WYATT KOSTYGAN.

“Man, it was a treat to go there,” Horne says. “I remember going there with my family for my parents’ birthday. It was that special place to go. He even remembers what he ate. Had an snail appetizer (I loved it) and starter. . . duck. “I’m a duck nut,” says Horne, recalling the one dish that has remained on the menu for the entire existence of Café L’Europe. “I still remember eating duck there. It was so memorable. Unbelievable.”

Linguine with prawns.  Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan.

SHRIMP LINGUINE. PHOTOGRAPH BY WYATT KOSTYGAN.

It will be a delicate balance to marry this tradition – the special place to go – with the need to satisfy a changing population with changing expectations of gastronomy. Visit any major city and discover the trendiest gourmet restaurants. You see jeans. You hear rock ‘n’ roll, hip-hop. It’s strong. They are alters to foodiedom. Sarasota isn’t quite there yet, but its food scene is changing, okay. So what about Café L’Europe?

“I really felt like a steward,” Horne said of his eight months at the helm. “I felt like it was our turn to run this stunning property.”

If ever there was a restaurant owner up to it, it’s Horne. He’s a man who’s built an empire that includes four (soon to be five) Anna Maria Oyster Bar locations. A man who bet on himself in 1995 when he funded the first location on City Pier. A man whose restaurants are so famous that they are the acronym for a local household: AMOB. He knows this area and the dining wants and needs of his audience. Horne and his magnetic personality are as inescapable here as the restaurant he plans to transform.

LEADER. THE MENU.

To do that, he needs a chef who understands the delicate balance between exclusivity and accessibility. Enter Jose Cuarta. He was named executive chef after nearly three years in the kitchen of the Michelin-rated Oak & Ola hotspot in Tampa, where he studied under award-winning chef James Beard (and Emeril Lagasse protege) Anne Kearney. Intense and demanding, Cuarta’s passion is as evident in the way he talks about food as in the way he prepares it. He believes in minimizing dishes. Keep it simple. A balance of flavors. It’s an endless quest for culinary perfection. If there’s one ingredient that can be homemade at Café L’Europe, it’s good. The revamp of the lunch menu, which debuted last summer, set the tone for the restaurant’s future.

For the piece de resistance of his fried chicken sandwich, the Kentucky native turned his new office into a fermentation station. You will not find any files in the binder. You won’t find pens or paperclips in the drawers. You’ll find the key ingredient in the restaurant’s “bottom of the drawer sauce,” a tangy honey glaze with a special twist that comes from the fermenting jars of hot peppers, carrots, onions, and more lurking in Chief Cuarta’s office.

Is the fried chicken sandwich typically European? Eh. Maybe not, but three distinct layers of crunch — toasted bread, pickled vegetables, and fried chicken breadcrumbs — pair perfectly with the spice and sweetness of the sauce. “That’s definitely where Kentucky comes in,” he admits. The evolution of the menu alone proves that this is not your grandfather’s Café L’Europe. There’s the L’Europe smashburger that – you guessed it – goes beyond what you thought a burger could be. It starts with the meat, which comes from the Providence Cattle Company of Tampa. When you eat the L’Europe smashburger, you’re biting into premium, antibiotic-free, growth hormone-free beef that has never crossed state lines. This is decidedly, proudly Florida. The onion jam that gives it a distinct and unique umami kick? Maybe it’s European. Maybe it comes from a whole other plane of existence. Accompanied by smoked cheddar, homemade pickles, dijonnaise and the lightly toasted sesame bun, you’ll wonder if all those burgers you’ve eaten in the past were really burgers.

Fear not, the faithful of Europe, the favorites from across the Atlantic remain. Try the croque madame. We’re not talking Oscar Mayer deli ham here. It’s specially imported Jambon de Paris, melting Gruyère, béchamel, Dijon mustard and a perfectly fried egg. Remember when I told you Cuarta was a perfectionist? Sunny Egg is a nice, round, precisely cooked garnish that asks your knife and fork to do their job ASAP.

And the quiche? Let’s go. It is a light, fluffy and fluffy dream. The crust is buttery, flaky, but not too rich. The custard is firm and melty on first bite, set on a bed of salted bacon and caramelized onions, Gruyere cheese and a perfectly browned top. It’s unlike any quiche you’ve ever had, worn down by hours and hours of trial and error from Cuarta. He and his team landed on a process where they blind bake the pie crust, layer the custard over and over again. . . and another layer, until ready to slow cook for just over 40 minutes.
“I think it’s one of those dishes that simply translates,” Cuarta says. “It doesn’t matter how old or how young you are. It’s a good classic dish no matter who you are. You can taste the time it took to perfect it. And that’s just lunch. The dinner menu will see a similar revamp, but some Café L’Europe reserve dishes like the aforementioned duck will remain – but perhaps with a twist. “We’re in Florida,” Cuarta says, “so why don’t you duck the orange?”

Not only is he shaking up the menu, Cuarta is also busy perfecting his new colleagues. “What I really admire about him is that he teaches all the time,” says Horne. “He constantly shows a sous chef or a new chef or a new cook on the line, here’s what I do and here’s why I do it. The guy teaches 24/7.

THE PAST. THE PRESENT. THE FUTURE.

Café L’Europe has been the backdrop for half a century of celebrations. Fancy first dates, schmoopy proposals, countless birthdays, anniversaries, and happy moments. The backdrop itself will evolve with the menu. Expect a fully renovated interior this year that aims to reflect the restaurant’s culinary evolution while nodding to its elegant past. “Special” is a word that Horne returns to again and again when discussing Café L’Europe. Contemplating this first impression he had of the restaurant, he takes a moment, smiles. “You know,” he said, blue eyes lighting up. “It was just a great restaurant. Yeah. You can always count on it being just fabulous. It bet the same for diners in Sarasota. So, has John Horne lost his mind? Not if you ask him.

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Australia: Academic Magazine Article Calls for ‘Israel’s Death’ https://continentalmag.com/australia-academic-magazine-article-calls-for-israels-death/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 19:34:39 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/australia-academic-magazine-article-calls-for-israels-death/ “University deplores religious and racial discrimination, including anti-Semitism” A recent article in the student magazine of the University of Adelaide in Australia called for “death to Israel”. The article published on August 4 in on saidwritten by Habibah Jaghoori, was motivated by Operation Breaking Dawn, which last month pitted Israel against Palestinian Islamic Jihad in […]]]>

“University deplores religious and racial discrimination, including anti-Semitism”

A recent article in the student magazine of the University of Adelaide in Australia called for “death to Israel”.

The article published on August 4 in on saidwritten by Habibah Jaghoori, was motivated by Operation Breaking Dawn, which last month pitted Israel against Palestinian Islamic Jihad in the Gaza Strip.

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“The solution to achieving peace and justice for Palestine is to demand the abolition of Israel,” Jaghoori wrote. “Free Palestine and death to Israel.”

Jewish students on campus said the article created a hostile environment at the institution. On Twitter, Jaghoori even called for Israel to be “annihilated” and declared “Death to America”.

In an email to Australian Jewish News, Jaghoori further stated that she was not necessarily targeting Jews. “Death to Israel,” she said, means “death to the state, to the criminal army, to occupations and to Zionism.”

Jewish organizations, however, called on the university to condemn the article.

In a response to the pro-Israel blog, cool from israelthe university declined to condemn the article directly, noting that on said enjoyed editorial independence.

“Like other higher education institutions, the University of Adelaide’s support for academic freedom and free speech is reflected in its free speech policy,” the university said.

“However, the university recognizes that freedom of expression is subject to legal restrictions, particularly with regard to incitement to violence and defamation based on race. The university deplores religious and racial discrimination, including anti-Semitism.”

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University of Queensland magazine article includes practical guide to flying https://continentalmag.com/university-of-queensland-magazine-article-includes-practical-guide-to-flying/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 00:28:52 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/university-of-queensland-magazine-article-includes-practical-guide-to-flying/ A student magazine has faced backlash after publishing a practical guide to shoplifting to help readers overcome the cost of living. University of Queensland Independent Student Journal Semper Floreat gave readers of his latest edition a three-level manual on what he called “frifting”, a shortening of “free shopping”. The article encouraged students, whom it equated […]]]>

A student magazine has faced backlash after publishing a practical guide to shoplifting to help readers overcome the cost of living.

University of Queensland Independent Student Journal Semper Floreat gave readers of his latest edition a three-level manual on what he called “frifting”, a shortening of “free shopping”.

The article encouraged students, whom it equated with “working class,” to take “from big business not ‘ma and pa’ joints” and only “what you need.”

Readers were told they could help others by turning a blind eye if they saw someone ‘cheating’.

The anonymous author has divided the guide into three parts – “groceries”, “clothing chains” and “choose your character”, with three rules applying throughout.

“Consider establishing a ‘safety radius’. Don’t frift near your home”, “be sure to frift during peak hours and on the busiest days of the week” and “park (if driving) away from the building and take CCTV into account” .

Those planning to target a grocery store should wear a face mask and cover identifiable body marks like tattoos, according to the article.

Students were encouraged to buy “two of each item” from clothing stores and wear the clothes they intended to “steal” out of the store.

They must also select a “character” before leaving, choosing from options such as “confused, stressed, awkward nerd: dress like a computer scientist, take a phone call”, and “flirtatious, sexy and slow to understand: pretend not to understand each other -service”.

At the bottom of the article, readers were told: “Semper Floreat does not condone illegal activity, but recognizes that breaking the law is sometimes a human right”.

The publication claimed to have preemptively prepared a response in anticipation of being asked to comment on its “frying” article.

“People are struggling to make ends meet. Students are incurring tens of thousands of dollars in debt and many are living in poverty as a result,” reads part of his statement.

“It’s a class war and the working class is under attack. We have no choice but to stand up and fight back.

He also conducted a poll in a University of Queensland Facebook group asking members if they thought the article was ‘cool’ or ‘uncool’, to which 54% said ‘cool’ and 25% said no. “not cool”.

The article was criticized by Queensland Education Minister Grace Grace, who said New that Semper Floreat “should withdraw” the article, while shadow education minister Christian Rowan said it was irresponsible to encourage criminal activity.

“We simply cannot have a situation where people are encouraged to commit criminal offenses or else we end up in a situation of anarchy,” he said. New.

Brisbane Greens Councilor Jonathan Sriranganathan, however, said there were instances where the theft was “ethically justifiable”.

Read related topics:Brisbane
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Life In Motion – Culture City :: SRQ Magazine article by Dylan Campbell https://continentalmag.com/life-in-motion-culture-city-srq-magazine-article-by-dylan-campbell/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/life-in-motion-culture-city-srq-magazine-article-by-dylan-campbell/ Sarasota-raised, Los Angeles-based artist Christian Sampson specializes in color-light projection. SRQ Review | September 2022 By Dylan Campbell In show Memories of Christian Sampson’s childhood inform his ever-changing light show, “Vita in Motu,” now on permanent display at the Sarasota Art Museum. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan. For Sarasota-born artist Christian Sampson, his life is always […]]]>

Sarasota-raised, Los Angeles-based artist Christian Sampson specializes in color-light projection.

Memories of Christian Sampson’s childhood inform his ever-changing light show, “Vita in Motu,” now on permanent display at the Sarasota Art Museum. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan.

For Sarasota-born artist Christian Sampson, his life is always on the move. It’s been that way since he was a young boy, cruising the waters of Sarasota Bay and has been on the move ever since – from his time at Ringling College of Art and Design to decades in New York as a contemporary artist on his recent move to Los Angeles. Although Sampson, who specializes in color light projection, has made a career out of moving with light, he still brings pieces of his hometown with him. Now, with his Vita In Motu exhibit, a permanent fixture of the Sarasota Art Museum (SAM), part of Sampson, will forever be fixed in Sarasota. “Growing up here is a real honor to have a permanent work in my hometown,” says Sampson.

Sampson’s 2019 installation Vita in Motu – or “life in motion” was created for the Sarasota Art Museum’s inaugural Color exhibition. The theory. & (b/w). The installation, which can be seen in the museum’s third-floor Jonathan McCague Arcade, uses the building’s architecture to create an ever-changing light show – sunlight pours through the wide lens-covered windows of the corridor, on dichroic film sculptures, which project light onto the walls, floors and windows of the space. The installation is more of an experience than a ‘traditional’ art exhibition – as the sun goes down throughout the day, eventually to be replaced by colored LED lights to create projections from the sculptures, the viewer can witness the art change in real time. “When art works, it allows the viewer to interact with the work individually. I want to create a sensory piece that allows the viewer to let the colors evoke emotions, feelings, experiences. I want them to be able to formulate their own experiences to these elements,” says Sampson.

Sampson was approached to create an installation for SAM’s 2018 opening after then-SAM director Ann Marie Russel visited his studio in New York. Sampson’s approach to the project, like his approach to much of his work, was site specific. “As the museum was finishing up and opening, she said they had this space with these windows with lots of light that could be good for an exhibit. I did a tour, brought some samples, and I started experimenting with how the path of the sun passed through windows and floors. I was trying to think of a way to integrate windows and space to have something dynamic and interactive that would involve both the viewer and allow the natural beauty and light of Florida to pass through and strike these sculptures,” says Sampson.

Although Sampson’s work is decidedly contemporary in style, his methodology works similarly to that of an artist in a more traditional medium, such as a painter. “I’m still thinking about how to animate this space to make it an interactive installation and create something that is 1 plus 1 equals another dimension? It’s like a blank canvas, and then I use the light as a paint box to paint that space,” says Sampson.

While light is Sampson’s brush, his palette stems from a fusion of childhood experiences and formative years on the west coast of Florida. Her time at Ringling College of Art and Design to earn her BFA particularly impressed Vita In Motu. “I worked for years at Ca’ d’zan and the way the sun filtered through the stained glass windows reminded me of this installation. My job at the Ringling was to change the light bulbs that had burned out on the paintwork. I was noticing all the different color ranges in the kelvin scale and how they affected the paints differently,” says Sampson.

The vivid pinks, blues and yellows so prominent in Sampson’s work are reminiscent of the vibrant natural colors found in Florida. “I grew up on the water. I remember being transfixed by the coral reefs the first time I went snorkeling when I was five years old. The lights and colors of the environment shaped my youthful palette. In Vita In Motu I was mostly trying to highlight that bright blue sky that gets a lot of clouds – I was trying to layer those colors so you get that reflection and projection that gives those clouds those shapes and at the same time is multidimensional,” says Sampson.

From New York to Los Angeles, Sampson’s career has taken him across the country. Through his work, however, the colors of Florida’s Gulf Coast – of his home, of his childhood, of his inner brushwork – will survive no matter where they are.

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Getting Sirius – Living Lakewood :: SRQ Magazine article by Abby Weingarten https://continentalmag.com/getting-sirius-living-lakewood-srq-magazine-article-by-abby-weingarten/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 19:53:59 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/getting-sirius-living-lakewood-srq-magazine-article-by-abby-weingarten/ Behind Karen Medford’s award-winning Sirius day spas SRQ Review | September 2022 By Abby Weingarten In Health and wellness Owner Karen Medford of Sirius Day Spa. Photograph by Wes Roberts. Entrepreneur Karen Medford has owned Sirius Day Spa since 2018 – with locations at Lakewood Ranch and UTC – and her desire for innovation continues […]]]>

Behind Karen Medford’s award-winning Sirius day spas

Owner Karen Medford of Sirius Day Spa. Photograph by Wes Roberts.

Entrepreneur Karen Medford has owned Sirius Day Spa since 2018 – with locations at Lakewood Ranch and UTC – and her desire for innovation continues to grow. She built her two spas from scratch and hired and managed a team of 40 people. Prior to his current company, Medford worked for the Laboratory Corporation of America/Integrative Genetics for nearly a decade, managing revenues of over $41 million and generating nearly $1 million in new revenue as a specialist. women’s health clinic.

How did you get started in the spa business? I have always frequented the local spas on my business trips in order to “prepare” myself for my meetings. It was all great until I had a family, and then being on the road wasn’t as much fun. During my travels, I heard an advertisement on the radio for a brand new concept: a spa for all your needs. It was on Sirius XM for a company called Sirius Day Spa. What are the chances?! My husband and I signed for three franchises. Then we realized there weren’t many advantages to a franchise if you were among the first. The brand recognition just wasn’t there, and I was spending a ton of money on ads and networking every chance I got. After seven months, and just opening the second location at UTC, we discovered that the parent company was going in another direction and changing its name. A year of developing a brand that I was really proud of was about to be changed. It was time to separate and become an independent brand. After a few months, the dream came true. Sirius Day Spa was independent and the name was ours.

How do you approach your business in an original way? We trust the recommendations of our team, analyze and finally decide to bring new devices, skin care lines or equipment. For example, according to the advice of our main beautician, we brought machines with the works: micro-current, LED light therapy, ultrasound treatments, etc. Each year, our goal has been to continue to innovate and grow. This led to the addition of the medspa team after two years, as well as the latest advancements such as IPL machines, Diamond Glow, Morpheus8 RF microneedling, body contouring and laser hair removal.

How did you decide to become an entrepreneur? Family, family, family. My husband has always been an entrepreneur and I respect him for his hard work while always making time for the kids. He was truly an inspiration to me and gave me the courage to take the leap into the corporate world. He continues to grow his businesses and is always there to support me. It was the best decision I’ve ever made, and even though I feel like I’m working harder than ever, that’s really what I love. My dream is for my daughters to see that hard work pays off and I hope to have a legacy to leave them.

How to manage a successful work/life balance? We have an annual sponsorship with the Sarasota Polo Club so from December through May our family packs up every Sunday and heads to Green Beach. Even though it’s practically across the street, we pack a day’s worth of picnic food, bubbles, juice boxes and our porch furniture to set up our placeholder.

How do you keep your energy and focus? Really, I don’t know what I would do without yoga, whether it’s hot yoga or Vinyasa; this is truly my saving grace. Not only does it keep me physically fit and reduce anxiety, but I feel like my best ideas came out of a yoga class. It brings clarity to my mind by helping me see something that was previously ‘obscured’.

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From Greece to India – Living Lakewood :: SRQ magazine article by Abby Weingarten https://continentalmag.com/from-greece-to-india-living-lakewood-srq-magazine-article-by-abby-weingarten/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 19:53:59 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/from-greece-to-india-living-lakewood-srq-magazine-article-by-abby-weingarten/ The families behind Apollonia Grill and Tandoor Fine Indian Cuisine in Cooper Creek. SRQ Review | September 2022 By Abby Weingarten In restaurants Eddie Yzeiri of Apollonia Grill. Grilling a Storm of Culinary Delights serving University Park diners for nearly a decade with its fresh Mediterranean cuisine, Apollonia Grill in the Cooper Creek area is […]]]>

The families behind Apollonia Grill and Tandoor Fine Indian Cuisine in Cooper Creek.

Eddie Yzeiri of Apollonia Grill.

Grilling a Storm of Culinary Delights serving University Park diners for nearly a decade with its fresh Mediterranean cuisine, Apollonia Grill in the Cooper Creek area is the pride of the Yzeiri family. “Apollonia was opened with the vision of bringing authentic Greek Mediterranean cuisine to our region. We wanted to offer quality recipes but in an accessible and friendly setting,” says Eddie Yzeiri, manager of Apollonia, who works in the restaurant business. for more than 20 years. “Greek and Mediterranean cuisine is familiar to me because it is the food I grew up on. Many of our recipes are family recipes or dishes that have evolved and improved with time. Eddie Yzeiri and his family also owned El Greco Café on Main Street in downtown Sarasota before launching local Apollonia in The Shoppes at UTC.

Running a restaurant has always been a collaborative effort. “My mother and father opened the restaurant every morning, preparing the soups, the sauces and launching the restaurant. When we entered, the kitchen was ready for cooking and the dining room was ready for the entry of guests,” says Eddie Yzeiri. “I worked in the kitchen and my brother worked in the dining room. Our two wives were key in welcoming guests and ensuring they had a positive experience. Today, at Apollonia, these roles have evolved, especially since the start of the pandemic. “When restaurants closed during COVID, it was a very scary time. Our whole family depended on the success of the restaurant; there was no other income,” says Eddie Yzeiri. “But we made it through, being there for each other and staying strong. Our team has grown but we are still involved in day-to-day operations. Following on from the 2013 opening of the first Apollonia, the Yzeiris opened a second location at The Landings in 2019.

The Apollonia menu, at both locations, is rich in beloved items. “Our Lamb Shank Osso Bucco (braised leg of lamb with vegetables, herbs and red wine) is a dish that takes a lot of work and the end result is this flavorful, super tender and delicious shank that is memorable,” Eddie Yzeiri says. “The Saganaki cheese is always a guest favorite – not only is it very tasty, but it comes with a show when lighting it up in front of the guests.” Lamb chops, skewers, branzino, lobster pasta and moussaka are also among the must-haves. But there is always more to come.

“We are very excited for the future. We are planning to renovate the restaurant of The Shoppes at UTC”, explains Eddie Yzeiri. “Along with this, we intend to revamp our menus and introduce exciting new dishes. We always keep improving.

Poonam Maini has come a triumphant way to where she is now—from growing up in a small village in India to pioneering fine Indian Tandoor cuisine on Cooper Creek Boulevard. Maini originally launched Tandoor on Clark Road in 2001 before moving to The Shoppes at UTC in 2013, and the restaurant will move to an expanded space this fall. But doing all of this – by herself – was no easy task. “My motivation to work hard was to give a life to my children,” says Maini.

Maini grew up in a village called Garhdiwala in India and entered into an arranged marriage as a teenager (she even gave a TED talk about her experience a few years ago in New York). She came to the United States in 1989 and eventually settled in Florida, but started Tandoor after her divorce. Maini had three dependent children (Milen, now 34; Shamini, now 31; and Shubi, now 24), and her daughters worked with her as waiters and hosts at the flagship venue. Now her son, Shubi, co-runs Tandoor with his mother.
This family culinary tradition has a long history. “I grew up eating the kinds of items I now serve at Tandoor. My dad was a very avid cook, not a professional cook, but he loved to cook,” Maini explains. “I love to cook. young girl, when I had to choose a chore,

I chose the kitchen. I loved being with my dad in the kitchen. Butter chicken, chicken tikka masala, lamb rogan josh, tandoori chicken and spicy biryani – all dishes with family roots – are some of Tandoor’s cherished specialties.

And Maini is as involved in the restaurant industry as she is in the non-profit sphere.

She founded the organization Share Care Global in 2017, an initiative that provides healthy food and educational opportunities to the poor in her home village in India (especially women and children). The organization also helps teach women how to become entrepreneurs. Maini also hopes to one day open a hospital and an orphanage in the village.
“Every meal we sell at Tandoor provides a meal for someone in our food shelter; that’s about 400 meals a day,” says Maini. “Before I die, even though there are five people saying ‘Poonam helped change our lives’, it gives me purpose. I work very hard every day because I know how many people depend on Tandoor, not just the 20 members of my team, but also the people we help in India. It inspires me to work harder. It brings me peace and makes me happy.

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Stick to it – TrendSport :: SRQ Magazine article by Dylan Campbell https://continentalmag.com/stick-to-it-trendsport-srq-magazine-article-by-dylan-campbell/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 19:40:33 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/stick-to-it-trendsport-srq-magazine-article-by-dylan-campbell/ Dasha Reich is always looking for inspiration. SRQ Review | September 2022 By Dylan Campbell in visual arts Dasha Reich in her studios. Dasha Reich is always looking for inspiration. So naturally, for her next show at the Art Ovation Hotel, she called on a lifetime of travel, culture and experience. “The exhibition is called […]]]>

Dasha Reich is always looking for inspiration.

Dasha Reich in her studios.

Dasha Reich is always looking for inspiration. So naturally, for her next show at the Art Ovation Hotel, she called on a lifetime of travel, culture and experience. “The exhibition is called Life’s Silk Road because I have lived in so many places in my life and everything has influenced me and stayed with me. It started in Prague, where I was born, and continues in Jerasulem, where I studied, then in New York, and now in Sarasota. With this exhibition, even though the paintings are very abstract, they reminded me of my travels,” says Reich. Reich is an abstract painter and artist who works primarily with a very unique set of materials – pure pigments and epoxy resins. This medium allows Reich to create paintings that are both abstract, yet resembling the natural world. “My resin room is a bit like my lab – all of my paints are resin mixed with high pigments, resulting in lots of little chemical reactions and mixing. I use material from England which has qualities that the other resins don’t, which allows me to do some interesting tricks with it,” attests Reich’s Academy of Art and Design as a teenager in Jerusalem—his introduction to resin was a happy accident. “My husband was an orthodontist. and knew a lot about different epoxies and resins. When I first used them, something just clicked,” says Reich.

While Reich has worked in resin as both a painter and a sculptor for 25 years, her exhibition this fall at Art Ovation represents a new step for her: the shift to purely abstract designs as opposed to the multi-layered resin paintings that she was known for. Whereas in his previous work, which involved meticulously retaining layers of flowers and lines – a process that could take up to three months – his large-scale abstract paintings had to be completed within hours due to the speed with which the resin hardens or dries. In these moments, Reich draws on her career in the fashion industry, a career in which she learned to make quick decisions when choosing complementary colors. “Six months out of the year I was on the road working with colors and fabrics and making quick decisions. This carries over to my work with resin, you don’t have days and days to make a decision Even still, there is a madly calculated method. Due to the large scale of his paintings, Reich can spend an entire day preparing the canvas and sorting out the technicalities of what colors to use and when to use them. that’s all you have to do is trust your instincts and dive in. “I know what I want to achieve but I compromise a lot during the painting process because the resin has a mind of its own. It becomes a blend 50 -50 between what I want and what the resin wants. Letting go is still a very new and somewhat scary thing for me,” Reich admits.

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Into The Badlands – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine Article by Dylan Campbell https://continentalmag.com/into-the-badlands-srqist-srq-magazine-article-by-dylan-campbell/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 19:14:11 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/into-the-badlands-srqist-srq-magazine-article-by-dylan-campbell/ The Bishop Museum has partnered with the Toomey Foundation for the Natural Sciences to create a week-long fossil-finding expedition. SRQ Review | September 2022 By Dylan Campbell In Science + Technology “It’s great fun going from rock to solid stone with your friends or people you’ve just met – it creates a great connection,” says […]]]>

The Bishop Museum has partnered with the Toomey Foundation for the Natural Sciences to create a week-long fossil-finding expedition.

“It’s great fun going from rock to solid stone with your friends or people you’ve just met – it creates a great connection,” says Constance Mae Castro, a 14-year-old student from Manatee County. Sometimes all you need to do is dig up the past to make new friends. The Earth’s past, which is more specifically the fossilized remains of dinosaurs that walked on this planet around 30 million years ago. That’s what eight Manatee County students and their parents found themselves doing last June, when they set out for the Nebraska Badlands as part of the annual Bishop Museum of Science and Nature Fossil Expedition. .

Over the past decade, the trip, funded by the Toomey Foundation for the Natural Sciences, has taken Manatee County teachers to Bradenton entrepreneur Jim Toomey’s ranch in the Nebraska Badlands for an expedition a week in search of fossils. Although a businessman by trade, Toomey grew up searching for fossils in the old Apac mine – now known as Benderson Park – and transferred his love for paleontology into a career benefitting the natural sciences. .

In recent years, the excursion has focused on students, aged 11-14, hoping for an emerging interest in paleontology and the natural sciences. “We focused on 11 to 14 year olds, children entering the last year of primary or middle school. At this age, they still have a passion for learning and trying new things, but they are blossoming a bit and figuring out what they want to do with their lives,” says Christine Michael, co-curator of the apprenticeship at the Bishop and one of the tour guides. Instead of a week spent working in the scorching sun, the expedition was split into two parts: three days spent in the field with Toomey, Roger Portell, director of the invertebrate paleontology and micropaleontology collections at the University of Florida/Florida Museum of Natural History, and Aaron Bokelmann, a science teacher at Manatee High School and Jim’s close friend, and three days spent visiting local attractions such as Mount Rushmore, Crazy Horse National Monument, and the Mammoth Site.

“As a child, all we are exposed to is what our parents know, what our teachers know, and that’s about it. This trip was so awesome because we also brought the parents. Some of them admitted they would never sign up for this stuff, but their kid was interested and boom, here they are sitting in the dirt and digging up a fossil with a rock hammer,” says Michael. “The first day we had lunch and got to know Aaron, Jim and Rodger, then we went mountain biking to the field. We started in a quieter, less hilly area where we saw lots of turtle teeth, bones and shell fragments. Everyone at least found something that day, which was really great,” says Constance.

The Badland’s distant past as a marshy, temperate water source for mammals has turned its unique geological formations into a graveyard of prehistoric animals. Most of the fossilized remains found by the students were from the Oligocene epoch, around 33 to 23 million years ago. This was the age of mammals, where the earliest ancestors of our modern animals such as Mesohippus, saber-toothed cats and oreodonts roamed the continent.

“I wanted to take the trip because I want to be a veterinarian when I grow up and I was really interested in learning more about some of the ancestors of some of our modern mammals,” Constance says.

While finding the fossils was one thing, extracting them from layers of solid earth and rock was another endeavor in itself. The multi-step process involved students using different tools such as paint brushes, stone hammers and screwdrivers to dig around the fossil and create a sort of pedestal for it to sit on. “The point is to try to figure out how big a piece you have without digging it all up. It’s kind of a slow exploration,” says Michael. Once the fossil comes out of the ground, the dirt pedestal and all, a plaster sheath is cast around the entire piece to prevent erosion.These plaster casts or field jackets are sent back to a Toomey associate who loosens the dirt and reconstructs the fossil for the student who found.

“The biggest fossil I found was an entire turtle shell, about 30cm from neck to back,” says 11-year-old student Jacob Farrington. “We’ll get it back in about a year,” he adds, referring to Fossil Christmas, the event where students receive their reconstructed fossils in about a year.

For a process as arduous as fossil mining has been and as excruciating as the wait for students to see their fossils, it was a journey well worth the time and effort. “In our group, we were just all connected. From the start we were great friends, even now we went to Jacobs and we still talk to them after the trip,” says Constance.

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Story In Wood – House & Home :: SRQ Magazine article by Abby Weingarten https://continentalmag.com/story-in-wood-house-home-srq-magazine-article-by-abby-weingarten/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 04:30:55 +0000 https://continentalmag.com/story-in-wood-house-home-srq-magazine-article-by-abby-weingarten/ Xavier Garcia Jr. in his studio. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan. Today, finely crafted tables and built-ins are the cornerstones from Xavier Garcia’s Sarasota-based design and woodworking business. “Building something that didn’t exist before and having it solve some problem is very satisfying,” says Garcia. It was a concept that Garcia first experienced while working on […]]]>

Xavier Garcia Jr. in his studio. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan.

Today, finely crafted tables and built-ins are the cornerstones from Xavier Garcia’s Sarasota-based design and woodworking business. “Building something that didn’t exist before and having it solve some problem is very satisfying,” says Garcia. It was a concept that Garcia first experienced while working on a bachelor’s degree in design architecture from the University of Florida in 2003. After graduating, Garcia returned to Sarasota in 2004. He worked for his father’s architectural and design-build contracting business, Las Casitas Design. and Marazul Building Company. Then the 2008 recession hit and the work dried up, Garcia says, leading him to switch to handyman-type jobs and finish carpentry. Eventually, Garcia found his niche as a freelance carpenter and founded Ninzan Studio in 2008. The company now serves Sarasota and Manatee counties, including areas such as Lakewood Ranch and the barrier islands. “I really enjoy the practical aspects of carpentry, which allows me to use most of my architectural training in the field,” says Garcia.

NINZAN STUDIO AND NINZAN BUILD, 1490 20TH ST., SARASOTA, 941-702-6076. NINZANSTUDIO.COM, NINZANBUILD.COM.

For a good decade, Ninzan Studio has provided customers with finish carpentry, cabinetry installation, exterior carpentry (such as gazebos and wooden decking), window and door installation, and woodworking. tailored. In 2018, Garcia expanded, earning his state-certified general contractor license and founding sister company, Ninzan Build, LLC. “With this addition, we continued to do carpentry work in the field, but we could now undertake larger work, which required additional permits and trades such as plumbing, electrical, mechanics, etc. .,” says Garcia.

As of 2020, Garcia took over the Wood Street Studio location at 1490 20th St. in Sarasota following the retirement of former studio owner Dale Rieke. There, Garcia and his team of five craftsmen now create custom wood furniture, bespoke cabinetry, and architectural millwork (and they bring in several trusted contractors for larger projects). “We focus on shop-built joinery and installing that work in conjunction with general contractor work through Ninzan Build,” says Garcia. “Ninzan Studio also offers design and shop drawing services so clients can see their projects on paper before any work is done.” These projects are diverse and complex. One notable undertaking was the 2016 guest suite renovation on Siesta Key. Ninzan handled the interior construction of a guest bedroom above the garage, interior framing and joinery, as well as the fabrication and installation of a set of barn doors in cypress trees and floating cypress shelves. “This project was fun. The pointed cypress material was provided by the owner (their family has a large amount stored on their family ranch in Wauchula, Florida),” says Garcia. “We didn’t draw anything for this project, but instead created mockups and sample boards to speed up the design process. The owner had a good idea of ​​what he wanted and we helped him get there . For this house, Ninzan also embarked on a cabinetmaking and terrace project. Garcia and his team designed a reclaimed barn beam fireplace mantle, a solid cypress prayer bench, an interlocking PVC roof deck, and cypress walls and cabinetry in the kitchen and laundry room.

Garcia is also immensely proud of the work his team did on “The Beneva House.” Ninzan tackled the exterior and interior trim, as well as the finish punching. The team worked closely with the builders at Bay Point Construction to install the entry door system, interior doors, door hardware, baseboards, custom wall and mantel, exterior beams, columns, ceilings and cladding. . Ninzan also built the children’s bedroom built-ins to match Taylor James’ distinct wardrobes. “The Beneva House project was primarily joinery, including interior wood ceilings and box beams, as well as exterior trim elements such as column wraps, box beams and facings,” says Garcia. . A number of other art projects by the Ninzan team have included a custom dining table and bench, crafted from locally harvested rosewood slabs with an ash base finished in a black stain (all three slabs were ground in sequence from the same tree); a quarter-sawn and quarter-sawn ash dining table with a natural finish and white stain; and a complete renovation of a 1970s ranch along the Manatee River. “I guess most of what I learned in architecture school was: given a set of parameters, solving a problem in a creative and meaningful way,” says Garcia. “Often the process is as important as the end result.”

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